Partner Visas


When you first start out on the Partner Visa Process there can be so many options to choose from. Should you choose Offshore, Onshore, Prospective Marriage Visa? Or maybe you are just not ready for a Partner Visa yet?

The partner visa category is one of the most common pathways for immigration to Australia offering both onshore (subclass 820/801) and offshore (subclass 300 Prospective Marriage and 309/100) visa options. It provides genuine couples with viable option to settle in Australia, which may lead to permanent residence in Australia.

That’s where our expertise comes in; we are experts in Partner Visas. As every relationship is unique and no two Partner Visa are the same, you should definitely get advice before applying for any visa or you risk loosing your application fee.

If you want advice book in for a Visa Planning Consultation now.


Prospective Marriage (Fiancé) Visa


Fiancé visas are the most common of all the partner visas. This visa is the first of a 3 stage process. The 3 stages are – fiancé visa - temporary spouse visa - permanent spouse visa.

The subclass 300 visa is intended for couples who plan to get married onshore or offshore within the visa validity period (nine months).

After your marriage has taken place, you can apply for a Partner (subclass 820/801) visa which provides a pathway to permanent residency.

To be eligible for this visa, you and your fiancé(e) must:

- be at least 18 years old, and not be closely related;

- be free to marry one another;

- not marry your partner before arriving in Australia

- genuinely intend to marry within nine months of the visa grant date

(if the marriage does not eventuate in this time, the visa will NOT be extended and the applicant will be required to leave Australia);

- have physically met, and be personally known to each other since turning 18 years of age; and

- genuinely intend to live together as a married couple.

This visa allows the applicant to work and study in Australia, however access to Medicare is not available until the subsequent Spouse visa has been lodged.


De Facto Visa


De facto visas make up less than 11% of partner visa applications and are the most difficult of the 3 types of partner visas to have approved. De facto visas have a tricky element to them as the “12-month rule” is applicable, which means you need to prove you have been in a relationship with your partner for 12 months PRIOR to the lodgement of your visa. There are ways around this requirement though in some instances, and we can guide you through this process if you are eligible.

However, you will need to provide genuine evidence of the date your de facto relationship commenced.

Like spouse visas, you will be required to demonstrate the genuineness and ongoing nature of your relationship. You can do this by providing a range of documentation and statements in support of your application.

After the initial two-year period, you may be granted a permanent visa if you are able to provide evidence of your ongoing genuine relationship and live together or only live apart only on a temporary basis


Spouse Visa


Marrying the love of your life is perhaps that most exciting and life changing event that most of us will ever experience. To apply for a spousal visa based on your marriage, you must be legally married to your partner. If you were married in a country other than Australia, your marriage will generally be recognised as valid under Australian law.

All applicants for a Partner Visa must have an Australian sponsor. Your sponsor must provide a written statement pledging to support you for your first 2 years in Australia, including accommodation and financial assistance to meet your reasonable living needs.

As a part of the application process, you will be required to demonstrate the genuineness and ongoing nature of your relationship. You can do this by providing a range of documentation and statements in support of your application. Additionally, applications are assessed against Australian health and character requirements.

After the initial two-year period, you may be granted a permanent visa if you are able to provide evidence of your ongoing genuine relationship and live together or only live apart only on a temporary basis

Alternatively, for those applicants who been married for longer than three years or for two years and have a dependent child together, you may be eligible to seek permanent residency instead.


New Zealand Relationship Visa


This visa allows someone who is not a New Zealand citizen to live in Australia with their family member who is a New Zealand citizen and who holds either a Special Category (subclass 444) visa and is living in Australia, or is eligible to hold a Special Category visa (subclass 444) and is accompanying you to Australia.